Articles

Our summer holiday took us to Crete this year as we were intent on having a walking holiday in and around the more mountainous region of Greece’s largest and most southerly island. Usually I would be armed with an SLR and several lenses for a trip of this nature, but after using just the tiny Leica X1 in New York earlier this year I felt confident that I could repeat the exercise with its successor, my recently acquired Typ 113.

The past nine months have been a hive of activity here at PhotoArk as once again we have been working on a major site update creatively dubbed ‘V4.0’! This unintentionally seems to have become an annual thing for us and I’m sure your asking, why another update?

Just over three years ago when I first brought my Pentax K-5 I wanted a lens that would cover me for most situations while I squirrelled money away to expand my system. Naturally I chose one of Pentax’s zoom lenses, the 16-50mm f2.8 which over the years I shared a love/hate relationship with. Optically it was great but it was big and suffered from some strange auto-focus issues. With an upcoming trip to Sicily I could not bear the thought of miss-focused, soft images. You can imagine my delight when the wonderful Pentax announced a Limited 20-40mm zoom lens, I could already see myself stood in front of Mount Etna with this gorgeous piece of kit mounted upon my K-5! I soon returned to reality and realised I needed to devise a way to finance this venture. Goodbye 16-50mm.

One of the many comments raised when comparing Leica’s X1/2/XE with their latest X Typ 113 is that of size. For many users the tiny dimensions of the original X camera were what drew them to the model, as it was one of the first digital compact cameras to offer image resolution similar to that of DSLR’s, but in a truly small package. This tiny camera went on to spawn (up until now) two further iterations of what is fundamentally the same model, containing enhancements and improvements over the original, making it an even more compelling proposition.

This is the second article in a series illustrating our favourite photography walks. Note that these articles are not intended as walking guides, but are merely an indicator as to areas we find photographically interesting. Lumsdale is an area of woodland, waterfalls and ruined mills a mile or so to the east of Matlock. Served by a couple of very narrow roads and a network of footpaths, it remained one of Matlock’s best kept secrets until recent years. However, encroaching housing developments have seen increased footfall as it was slowly discovered by dog walkers and those living nearby who enjoy the romantic atmosphere offered by cascading waterfalls, ivy clad ruins and still ponds.

How many of you use some kind of clear filter to protect the exposed element of your lenses for fear of damaging them? There are a couple of different types that do the job well; UV and Skylight are two that spring immediately to mind and, as their names imply, bring benefits to certain photographic situations.

I have the kind of personality that loves attention to detail and fine engineering. It plays an important factor not only when it comes to deciding what I purchase, but even those that are beyond my reach, or that I am not particularly interested in. I also appreciate the little things that separate an item from the ‘me to’ crowd.